Talking online storytelling in tonight’s SPJ chat

If you’ll be online tonight, join me on the Society of Professional Journalist’s monthly Twitter chat at 8 p.m. ET.

The topic this month is Online Storytelling, featuring Mark Luckie of the Washington Post and 10,000 Words (also author of The Digital Journalist’s Handbook) and Mark Briggs, author of Journalism Next and Journalism 2.0. Oh, and me, repping TBD.

I have no idea why I was invited, as I have not written a book and am not famous – but I’ll be chatting and hopefully saying smart things.

If you’d like to participate, follow the hashtag. More info from the official sources.

What sort of storytelling methods, tools and examples would you like to talk about? Leave a comment or drop me a tweet.

Tumblr is ideal for spur-of-the-moment news projects

Tumblrs are showing up all over the news these days. From Politico to Pro Publica, The New Yorker and Newsweek – it’s become a popular platform for collecting links, images, quotes – pretty much whatever journalists find interesting that they can’t get into their regular stories and posts.

In experimenting with Tumblr for various possible future TBD projects, I’ve been astounded at how easy it is to kick off a theme blog. Aside from the 30 seconds or so it takes to set one up, if you have an idea in mind, you can populate it really quickly. Case in point: My coworker Jeff Sonderman said on Twitter Tuesday morning that he wished there were a Tumblr for holiday clichés. Within minutes, I had one set up and populated. It is now owning my life.

Tumblr says it is adding 25,000 new accounts daily, and each month it serves up [...]

10 ways journalists can use Storify

When Storify came on the scene, it inspired a lot of oohs, ahhs and speculation as to how it would work for journalists. Here are some ideas. [...]

Storify narrative: Death outside DC9

On October 15, I used Storify at TBD to make sense of an ever-changing series of events involving a death outside popular Washington D.C. nightclub DC9.

In the course of one day, the story took a lot of twists and turns, illustrated in the narrative by tweets (from both news orgs and those reacting), photos, video and documents. Reading down the story, you can get a feel for how the events developed and evolved in a way that’s not entirely dissimilar to more traditional narrative stories.

I talked a little bit more about the story behind this piece to the Nieman Storyboard, if you want to know more. Here’s the Storify: