How News Brands Should Set Up Google+ Pages

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Google made Brand Pages available last fall. Much like Facebook Pages, this allowed for companies, organizations, causes and the like to have a customized G+ presence that’s separate from a personal profile.

A properly set-up Page will help your news organization not only connect with users on Google+, but also help your stories and profiles get found more easily in Google searches.

To sign up for a Page, you first need a personal Google+ account to serve as an administrator. You’ll need to be logged in to that account in order to follow the directions to set up a Page. Mashable has a very helpful slideshow walking through the Google+ Brand Page signup steps, if you feel like you need that level of detail. Otherwise…

 

Setting Up Your Profile

1. Sign up for your Page (only after making sure no one else has set one up for your site [...]

There’s a whole Internet outside of Twitter, so don’t forget it

Pew released a new study on Twitter demographics today that found only 8 percent of Americans on the web use Twitter. Of that 8 percent, only 2 percent use Twitter on a typical day. Keep in mind that about 74 percent of American adults are internet users, meaning that the Twitter users make up about 6 percent of the entire adult population.

This news shouldn’t be surprising, but maybe it is to those who live in the Twitter echo chamber.

When all of your friends, your coworkers, your spouse and the media you consume are on Twitter, it may seem logical to believe a great deal of America is as well. This is a dangerous assumption for journalists and media organizations to make – and I know I’ve been guilty of it from time to time.

While I still think it is very important for journalists to use Twitter, the [...]

Four who influenced my approach to social media

As part of their 35th anniversary, Poynter is crowdsourcing a list of the 35 most influential people in social media. They ask people to write Facebook notes or tweets recommending people for the list, with votes to come via re-tweets and likes.

This kind of voting system makes it very likely that we’ll see the 35 usual suspects on the list when it’s all said and done: Vadim Lavrusik, Robert Quigley, Andy Carvin, Craig Kanalley and my boss, Steve Buttry, I’m sure, will be shoo-ins. It’s with this in mind I want to recognize people many voters in this group probably won’t know, but who’ve influenced my approach to social media more than just about anyone else.

#1 & #2 (tie): Kevin Dugan & Daniel Lally

I put these two guys together because their influence is interconnected in so many ways. I got into social media as we know it [...]

How we did it: Securing an occupied Twitter handle

It can be tough to be a new brand these days. Locking down namespace online is a huge part of a brand build – but much like potential mates, all the good ones seem to be taken.

We ran into that when we started building the brand for the soon-to-launch TBD. It’s a popular acronym, as everyone knows, so securing that namespace in social media was quite challenging. Though we’ve been tweeting for nearly two months as @TBDDC, this week we finally acquired @TBD. This is how it went down.

We wanted @TBD from the start, but it was occupied by a private, dormant account with zeroes across the board – no followers, no follows and no tweets.

Obviously, the first step in this scenario is to try to contact the handle owner. From my own account, I requested to follow this user to see if they were checking their [...]

The Enquirer’s print-only news experiment

Recently, The Cincinnati Enquirer has been making some stories print-only with the intent of boosting single-copy sales of the Sunday newspaper. Will it work? [...]

How the National Enquirer is using social media to campaign for a Pulitzer

The National Enquirer’s campaign to get Pulitzer attention should make other journalism outlets stand up and take note. They’ve changed the debate from being about politics rather than merit – and it is brilliant. [...]

Facebook friends: Please stop spamming me

Social networking is supposed to be about connecting with old friends and making new ones. It can involve marketing products, but it takes individualized recommendations to be anything but spam. [...]

Recommended reading for June 10th-12th

Recommended reading that’s mostly about Twitter this time – monetization models, the end of the “real” Colonel Tribune, Twitter grammar, tools and other fun stuff. [...]

Recommended reading for May 26-27

Recommended links include an explainer on the difference between Facebook groups and pages, the new social media editor at the New York Times and some handy rules for social media. [...]

Recommended reading for April 21st

These are my recommended links for April 21st:

Why journalists should learn to code (and why some shouldn’t bother) :: 10,000 Words – “Those who choose to adhere to long-standing forms of print or broadcast journalism shouldn’t fret, but know that there will come a time when basic coding will become an integral part of a journalist’s duties. It’s better to jump on the bandwagon now than to be left in the dust later on.” Seattle ‘P-I’ Sinks Without Print Boost – In their Top 30 Newspaper Sites for March, Editor & Publisher makes the point that online-only newspapers aren’t quite making it with audiences just yet. Do they need print to survive? That remains to be seen. How To Increase Your Chances of a Twitter Follow Back | John Chow dot Com – A lot of this is what I would consider no brainers, but worth a quick read [...]

Recommended reading for April 14th through April 17th

These are my recommended links for April 14th through April 17th: [...]